POS Manual Discounts Part 3 – Capturing Reasons for Discretionary Discounts a Cashier Gives at the POS

In Part 1 of this series, Simple Manual Discounts at the Point of Sale, Matt Street, Retail Product Lead at ArcherPoint, showed the basics of how cashiers can give discretionary line and total discounts at the Point of Sale. Part 2, Adding Limits to Discounts, explained how to limit the amount of the discounts that cashiers can give.

In this short video, Matt uses Microsoft Dynamics NAV with LS Retail to capture the reasons why a discretionary discount was offered at the Point of Sale. We will add to the requirements outlined in Parts 1 and 2 to say that cashiers should be required to enter or select a reasons as to why they gave a discretionary discount.

In Part 4, Matt will offer examples of some calculation choices for when a manual line and total discount are used together on a single sale.

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Check out all the blogs in the POS Manual Discount Series:

POS Manual Discounts Part 1 – Introduction to Simple Manual Discounts at the Point of Sale
POS Manual Discounts Part 2 – Adding Limits to Discounts a Cashier Can Give at the POS
POS Manual Discounts Part 3 – Capturing Reasons for Discretionary Discounts a Cashier Gives at the POS
POS Manual Discounts Part 4 - Discount Interactions and Calculations

Below is a transcript of the video:

 

Hello, and welcome to another edition of the ArcherPoint Retail Video Blog series.

This is part three of a short series of blogs that describes how discounts are applied at the point of sale.

In part one of the series, Simple Manual Discounts at the Point of Sale, we showed the basics of a cashier giving discretionary line and total discounts at the POS.

Part two, Adding Limits to Discounts, explained a few ways to limit the discounts cashiers can give.

In this blog, we’ll explore ways to capture a reason for why the cashier gave a discretionary discount. Adding to our user stories from parts one and two, we’ll add the requirement that cashiers should be required enter or select a reason for why they gave the discretionary discount.

In LS Retail we can do this, by adding a POS action that is triggered by the discount line function. When that discount line function is executed, it will execute the action – Discount Reason, which I have defined just to be a text input. So let’s give it a try.

If I do sales adjustments and a line discount, it’s going to ask us the line discount, percentage, and then a reason. This, then, becomes recorded as part of this transaction. Let’s finish this transaction by paying cash for it, and then go take a look.

This is the last transaction that we entered. So we should be able to navigate to any information code entries that were associated with the transaction, and we see that our action that we defined in our POS actions is documented here. And what we typed into the text box is also here.

We can take this a step further by providing a panel of choices to our cashier for the reason as to why they give the discount. To do this we’ll use the same action, POS action, but we’ll change the Do-action ID to a code that I created that will prompt for a number of different reasons that are the most likely situations that we would give a discount for.

So in this case when we give our line discount of 10%, we now get this discount reason panel, and it’s asking us to choose a reason. We can say that this was a discount for a damaged item. But let’s see what happens if we choose “Other”. LS Retail is flexible enough to be intelligent with the choices that you make to let them flow together. So if we choose the Other reason, we can hook that to our original code that asked for the text input for the reason. So let’s complete this transaction. Once again, pay cash. And take a look at the resulting transaction. We can take a look at the two sales entries. And if we look at the info code for the first one, we see that our action of the panel and the information that’s provided is that it was damaged. And all those reasons are coded, so that we can do analytics later on. For the one that we had Other, we can look and see we have two info code entries for it. One was that the cashier chose Other, and the second one is the text description of that Other.

Thanks for watching, and stay tuned for Part 4 of the Manual Discount Series, where we will show some calculation choices for when a manual line and total discount are used together on a single sale.

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